Japanese Cooking // Omurice Recipe

Omurice is something I cook a lot at home and I also had it whilst in Japan. It’s a Western-influenced dish, that consists of rice and omelette, with different fillings, flavourings and toppings added. There’s also a version using noodles instead of rice which I really want to try at some point! It may not be the most photogenic dish, but it tastes great!

Omurice is incredibly easy to make and uses ingredients that we usually have in the cupboard/fridge already. This recipe is based on this one by Serious Eats, but I’ve changed it up a bit to more-so suit us and the food we usually have readily available in the cupboard. We are lucky enough to live near a great Japanese supermarket which sells any specialist Japanese products needed for this, but I’ve also added some great alternatives. You could also leave out the meat to make it vegetarian!

ingredients needed for omurice 1 ingredients needed for omurice 1

To make omurice for two people you will need:

  • 2 cups of cooked Japanese rice – short-grain rice that you can find in most supermarkets
  • Vegetable oil
  • 1 onion
  • 3 cloves of garlic – I usually use the jars of pre-chopped garlic. You can use less than this if you’re not so much of a fan
  • 1 cup of frozen peas – or any frozen veg you prefer
  • 2 carrots – or any other veg you prefer, but as the carrots take longer to cook they need to be added a bit before
  • 4 skinless and boneless chicken thighs – or any other meat you prefer
  • ½ a cup of okonomiyaki sauce – I get this online or from an Asian supermarket. Alternatively, here is a recipe that you can make from easier available ingredients. I’ve also used ketchup as a great alternative sauce.
  • 3 spring onions
  • Cayenne pepper (to taste)
  • Salt & pepper
  • 4 large eggs – 2 per person for the omelette
  • Mayonnaise (preferably Kewpie) to serve
  • Seaweed flakes – I use Welshman’s Caviar because it’s sold near me, but you can just use any toasted seaweed or furikake. You could even chop up nori sheets.
  • Pickled Red Ginger – Also called Beni Shoga. This is a common ingredient used with Japanese dishes and can be found at Asian supermarkets, online and sometimes in big supermarkets with world food sections.

Method:

  1. Start with cooked rice. This could be leftovers from the day before or you can cook it fresh. Heat some oil in a large frying pan and once hot add the rice. Cook this until it starts browning ever so slightly, then transfer to a bowl to use later.
  2. Put some more oil into the same pan and fry the onions, garlic and carrots if you’re using them. Fry until slightly softened.
  3. Add the meat and rest of the veg and fry until cooked.
  4. Take the rice and add it to the pan and stir so everything is combined.
  5. Add the okonomiyaki sauce and cayenne pepper. I usually start with a small sprinkle and taste to see if it’s enough or not. Then add the spring onions and season with salt and pepper. Cook for a couple of minutes so the okonomiyaki can get nice and glossy.
  6. Transfer this mixture to a bowl whilst you cook the omelette. To do this, wipe out the frying pan you used for the rice with some kitchen roll and crack two beaten eggs into the pan. Keep swishing them around to get the omelette nice and fluffy whilst making sure you try and keep it in a circular shape.
  7. Once the omelette is cooked – it should be nice and creamy on the top – turn off the heat.
  8. To serve your omurice, make a dome of rice on the plate. I do this by putting the rice into a round bowl and putting it upside down on the plate.
  9. Place your omelette on top of the rice and tuck the sides in slightly so it looks tidy.
  10. Top with more okonomiyaki sauce, mayo, flakes of seaweed and the pickled ginger. Enjoy whilst hot 🙂
Okonomiyaki omrice for two
Omurice filling

Let me know in the comments if you try my omurice recipe and what you think!

What's Your Reaction?
Excited
0
Happy
0
In Love
0
Not Sure
0
Silly
0
View Comments (0)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

© 2020 RACHEL SULEK DESIGN. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Scroll To Top